Insurance Complications When Having Ulcerative Colitis

insuranceIf you’re looking to (or having to) get new insurance soon or are going through it right now, you may find that you’ll have to jump through a few hoops.

There are some complications that can come up when looking to get insurance and you have Ulcerative Colitis. Whether you’re recently married and now looking to get life insurance or if you’re just looking for health insurance itself, it can get expensive simply due to your condition.

Health Insurance

The health insurance issues I was having (years ago) just after college were quite a mess. I was completely uninsured for a while and the only thing that helped me was going to grad school.

The school gave all students the option to get insured through them. It was a HUGE blessing for me, plus it was decently affordable at the time and didn’t break my piggy bank.

Today, there are a number of changes in place that assist with getting health insurance when you have Ulcerative Colitis. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or, colloquially, Obamacare, is a United States federal statute signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010.

ACA has been a bit of a help for those with Ulcerative Colitis, but the premiums are still a bit high for me. Instead, and thankfully, I was offered insurance through my employers.

Either way, even if you’re not offered health insurance through your employer, you can always check for health insurance on the healthcare exchanges (https://www.healthcare.gov/) or do a search on eHealthInsurance.com.

Life Insurance

Life insurance is a whole different ballgame compared to health insurance. Basically, it’s insurance for someone who proverbially “kicks the bucket.” Once that happens, the loved ones or beneficiaries get a payout. There’s a bit more to it, but that’s the concept in a nutshell.

When it comes to getting life insurance and you have Ulcerative Colitis, you’re probably going to pay quite a bit more than the average healthy person.

To give you an example, the other day, my lovely wife and I decided to start on the path of getting life insurance. I figured everything would be decently priced (relative term) and all. This is especially since, of course, neither of us is planning on “kicking the bucket” any time soon.

We checked a few different places and received a few quotes. She doesn’t have Ulcerative Colitis and is in pretty good health. She’s also roughly the same age as I am. Low and behold, her life insurance was extremely cheap compared to mine.

“Her life insurance was extremely cheap compared to mine,” as in, her life insurance was about one quarter of what mine was.

Granted, I was originally diagnosed with this condition (Ulcerative Colitis) back around 1998, so it has been a while.

After we received the quotes, we made a decision to go with Liberty Mutual. Once we made that decision there was an underwriting process for our particular policies that we also had to go through. The underwriting process is basically:

  • Getting a physical (they’ll actually come to your house – which I thought was VERY cool)
  • The insurance company will track down and analyze your medical records for more insights on your health.

After the underwriting process was completed, we were notified by our agent that my premium(s) or the costs of my policy are going to just about double. This is on top of the already double to quadruple the cost of my wife’s policy.

Needless to say, we had to tweak a few things with the policy to make it worth it.

Thoughts On Insurance With Ulcerative Colitis

Little did I know that this disease would double to quadruple my life insurance cost before the underwriting process (let alone after it). I’ve run into this issue in the past with health insurance before, but now with life insurance this was new for me. It’s definitely a different ballgame. Things are interestingly different.

I hope this helps some of you, but all the best in this journey that we share.

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